Other Conditions

Bone spur

In 1988 my wife had had a bone spur in her wrist for almost three years. Three doctors in Grenada and Barbados had been unable to provide relief. So we decided to try BVT. Her treatment consisted of an application of three to six stings over and around the spur every other night for four months. Before each session, some crushed ice wrapped in a piece of cloth helped reduce the affected area’s sensitivity to the pain of the stings. The first week was frustrating, as the stings seemed to actually increase her discomfort. But we kept at it, and at the end of the second week she noticed a big reduction in the pain, as well as the absence of a feeling of “tension” (her word) around the area. At the start of the second month the size of the concretion started to diminish, and by the end of the fourth month it had disappeared. Sixteen years later, she has had no recurrence at the site or elsewhere. – Jorge Murillo-Yepes murillos@caribsurf.com January 07, 2009

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Baby with a Tumor

I engaged in a desperate attempt to help a baby with a tumor that members of the medical community viewed as inoperable and hopeless. They said the tumor was causing calcification that would spread to the eye, causing blindness, and then to the brain, and eventually causing death. For 3 months I gave the baby continuous micro-stings (limited pricks or punctures with the “needle” of the sting removed from the bee) 3 times a week; she never cried during the procedure. I then applied a “real” sting to the tumor itself on the inside of her cheek. Before applying the sting, I swabbed the area with extract of propolis and let it sit for 5 minutes. Propolis has a powerful anesthetizing effect (it has been shown to be 10 times stronger than cocaine as a local anesthetic). The baby made a face, but there were no tears. As of the last report, the tumor has shrunk a lot, along with the external discoloration. The area is now soft – not hard the way it was before BVT. – Reyah Carlson beecharmer1958@aol.com January 07, 2009

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Aseptic Necrosis of the Head

In aseptic necrosis of the head of the femoral bone, circulation is blocked, typically by trauma. In time the bone becomes deformed, with arthrosis of the oxo-femoral articulation, shortening of the leg, lameness, and disturbance of the spinal cord and of the other coxo-femoral articulation. Most cases are very painful, though many patients seek medical help only when the disease is advanced. However, with bee venom it is possible to interrupt this process. My example is that of a 10-year-old boy who was struck by a car two years ago. I saw him 8 months after the accident, by which time he had degeneration of the head of the bone and of the neck of the bone (the part between the head and the body of the femur). For bee venom, I first used Apireven and then VENEX 10 in diluted form, because of the age of the patient. The bee venom was diluted 1/5 from VX10, a strength that produced a good reaction and was tolerated well. He was given 2 sessions a week, with no more than 7 stings at each session. At the beginning of the treatment I applied the BVT on the lumbar zone of the urinary bladder acupuncture meridian. A month later I applied it to the points above the articulation on the anterior part of the body, on the lateral part, and on the back side of the body, between the points stinging by the lateral part and the points stinging by the urinary bladder meridian; this way I surrounded the joint with the stinging. In addition I used royal jelly, pollen, propolis, and honey internally and also some medicinal plants. After a few days of treatment, the pain disappeared and he was able to walk without limping. Three months later, radiologists declared that progression of the disease had stopped. The bone’s structure was denser, and the neck of the bone was thicker both results were signs of the bone’s regeneration. So, by using bee venom and other natural remedies, it is possible to help even the bone to reconstruct. – Cristina Aosan draosan@zappmobile.ro January 07, 2009

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Tumor

An apiculturist’s friend was in despair, having been diagnosed with a malignant tumor too far advanced for possible surgical removal. The apiculturist took him to an apiary with the affected area uncovered. The first day a swarm of bees stung him in the affected area. He went to the apiary once a week. After a while, each time he was stung (I should say pricked) by fewer bees in that area, and the time came when no bees stung him at all. At that point the apiculturist advised him to go to a doctor, who was greatly surprised to learn that the tumor had disappeared. We would like to study this effect on malignant tumors in rats, but we have not been able to start it; the Health Ministry lacks the needed funds. Ironic, isn’t it? But for now, I recognize that bees have the gift of knowing where they must sting. Mother Nature is wise. Even so, physicians-acupuncturists must also know where to place the needles. – Dr. Eduardo Lema celema@adinet.com.uy January 07, 2009

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BVT for chronic pain

The clever, feisty little honeybee has changed my life. Never having been introduced to the high-spirited little ladies before, I am now, one year later, intimately connected to these healing sisters of nature. At first, when Todd Hardie from Honey Gardens Apiaries identified the girls as a way of healing chronic pain, I was wary, even alarmed, at the idea of being voluntarily stung by a bee. But Todd’s wisdom and relentless encouragement led me to give it a try. Thus did I meet a major healer in my long search and deepening relationship with many forms of alternative healing, as Todd introduced me to Frederique Keller—acupuncturist, apitherapist, and healer. With her expertise and faith in the healing power of BVT and the requisite sense of humor and courage to do this work, Frederique set about to help me feel better and begin to heal. This is what I have done and continue to do. My health has definitely improved. I have more energy, more stamina. For someone in relentless pain, I’m capable of something very empowering. With the bee stings, I feel I can manage the pain. A debilitating pain in my neck and upper back becomes tamed. Difficulty walking because my knees hurt big time is relieved, and the stairs seem easier. Hurtful arms and hands are released so I can hold a book to read and do what I enjoy the most—draw and paint. No, the pain is not entirely gone. I have a mere one year of bee therapy compared with 18 years of struggle, but given the rapid improvement in one year, the odds are pretty good for a lasting and complete recovery with continued care. Finally, a word about what I call “the energetics” —the bees. They seem to bring to me a life force that was depleted. I don’t know the chemical components of their healing venom, but I do know that I’ve experienced something elusive yet tangible. I think of it as a light wave entering my body. It courses its way from the site of the sting to whatever needs to be healed, released, and finally let go of. It’s like being vaccinated by nature. Thousands of years of healing energy straight from the source is contained in each sting, and I can access this to make my tired, ill body better. In a word, there is HOPE. I can’t fully describe what I’ve been taught and what has been communicated to my body through this close relationship with a high form of feminine energy. It’s not lost on me that the “girls” die once they have generously healed me. They give their lives so I can have a better one: no small feat for such a tiny creature. There’s an inexplicable, awesome order to this. Sometimes after a bee has shared her life force with me, she’ll fly near where I’m sitting and allow me to pet her soft silky back. I feel the tiny flutter of her wings on my finger. I say thank you, and she seems to take a tiny bow, or so I like to think. – Teddy Shevack intheimage@comcast.net January 07, 2009

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A cure

It all began with a phone conversation last October when one of my oldest and closest friends seemingly had gone off her rocker. She had warily told my wife and her best friend of a crazy new pathway to healing. The tale was incredible. She had met Kristine Jacobson, an apitherapist in Grand Rapids , Michigan , who had begun treating her damaged and arthritic knees by actually stinging her with honey bees. Real bees. Live bees. Those little creatures we’d learned to fear since childhood! My only thought was, what a bizarre remedy. I was convinced that she had finally slipped over the edge, even though she swore she was getting relief in her first weeks of treatment. My wife, Ardy, however, was enthusiastically and passionately pursuing anything she could find on the Internet that would persuade me to take a leap of faith and risk my not-so-comfortable comfort zone to find a cure for me. “A cure for me.” What a concept. I had long before given up fantasies of “cure” and chased down every pain-relieving pill, infomercial gimmick, or magic wand I could find – with little or no relief from the chronic and debilitating pain that I had been experiencing for 25 years. After an injury at work in 1979 and subsequent surgery, there had been little respite from the pain. Ultimately, in 1985 I was given the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis, with a poor prognosis and a dim future. Over the years, things I had taken for granted were stripped from me. I couldn’t walk more than 20 feet at a time, I couldn’t sleep in my bed with my wife, I couldn’t sleep, period. I couldn’t bend over to pick up a coin from the floor, I couldn’t stand up straight, I couldn’t pick up my grandsons once they were big enough to toddle.. I couldn’t even put on my own socks and shoes. Life had become a mere existence. The strongest of pain relievers never took the pain away – but they did manage to turn me into a zombie while dulling the pain and my senses as well. At the time of “The Call” I had been wondering if life was truly worth continuing. In November 2003 Ardy flew from our home in Las Vegas to Grand Rapids to help celebrate her mother’s 80 th birthday. I stayed at home because traveling on a plane, let alone walking through an airport, was more than I could withstand. During that visit she was able to see our friend Cherie’s results first-hand, and to get acquainted with Kristine. That visit sent Ardy’s level of enthusiasm out of the ball park. Kristine showed her how to gently snatch the bees from the jar and guided her as she placed the stings on Cherie’s back and knees and later watched as she removed the stingers. Upon Ardy’s return, any resistance I might have had earlier was expunged with one lift of her eyebrow. Immediately we began “healing from the hive” (thank you for the term, Rita Elkins) by taking honey, propolis, royal jelly, and bee pollen. I began reading everything we could find on the Web, even searching for negatives, yet finding only positives and inspiration. Dared I even hope that I could find relief in these little creatures I had been taught to fear? I tucked a thought behind my ear, in the back of my mind, to apologize later to Cherie for my previous accusations of dementia. Kristine had introduced us, through email, to her cousin and mentor, Reyah Carlson in Ventura , California . Under Reyah’s guidance, we began preparing for my treatment. My first hurdle was to convince my doctor of my chance for recovery, or at least relief of my pain, by engaging in this unconventional treatment. The second hurdle was to get him to change some of my medication and to give me a prescription for an EpiPen. Providentially, I had a doctor who was receptive to this idea and excited about the prospect. He replaced medications that would hinder the positive effects of the bee stings and looked forward to tracking my progress. By early spring, enthusiasm had engulfed me as well. Reyah had been emphatically firm in her belief that I could be liberated from my pain, and I was chomping at the bit to get going. Finally, on April 3 we made the trip from Las Vegas to Ventura , where we met Reyah for the first time. She was an excellent and knowledgeable teacher. She gave me my first stings and taught Ardy the techniques and time table to treat me at home. That day I was certain that my life was changing forever. I got determined, took the bull by the horns, and changed my life style. I began eating better and moving more. By the end of the first week my spirits had lifted to an all-time high. I was teasing Cherie about her coming birthday, which I had formerly done but had stopped several years earlier because fun for me had long since ceased to exist. My first cognitive awareness that I was improving came when I bent over and picked up a coin from the floor. I don’t know why I felt I could do it. But I did! By the end of the second week, I was able to walk throughout our Wal-Mart superstore for nearly two hours without once sitting down. I had been confined to a handicap cart for what had seemed like an eternity and was now miraculously walking pain-free within two weeks of beginning bee venom therapy. At four weeks I was able to put on my own socks and tie my own shoes. But infinitely better than that, I discarded my night-time confinement to a recliner and began sleeping again with my amazing and beautiful wife. What a reward! At five weeks I was able to take a road trip to Zion National Park and the
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